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NATS Server Monitoring

To monitor the NATS messaging system, NATS provides a lightweight HTTP server on a dedicated monitoring port. The monitoring server provides several endpoints, including varz, connz, routez, and subsz. All endpoints return a JSON object.

The NATS monitoring endpoints support JSONP and CORS, making it easy to create single page monitoring web applications.

Enabling monitoring

To enable the monitoring server, start the NATS server with the monitoring flag -m and the monitoring port.

Monitoring options

-m, --http_port PORT             HTTP PORT for monitoring
-ms,--https_port PORT            Use HTTPS PORT for monitoring

Example:

gnatsd -m 8222

You should see that the NATS server starts with the HTTP monitoring port enabled:

[4528] 2015/08/19 20:09:58.572939 [INF] Starting gnatsd version 0.8.0
[4528] 2015/08/19 20:09:58.573007 [INF] Starting http monitor on port 8222
[4528] 2015/08/19 20:09:58.573071 [INF] Listening for client connections on 0.0.0.0:4222
[4528] 2015/08/19 20:09:58.573090 [INF] gnatsd is ready</td>

To test, run ‘gnatsd -m 8222’, then go to http://localhost:8222/

Monitoring endpoints

The following sections describe each supported monitoring endpoint: varz, connz, routez, and subsz.

/varz

The endpoint http://localhost:8222/varz reports various general statistics.

{
  "server_id": "ec933edcd2bd86bcf71d555fc8b4fb2c",
  "version": "0.6.6",
  "go": "go1.5.0",
  "host": "0.0.0.0",
  "port": 4222,
  "auth_required": false,
  "ssl_required": false,
  "max_payload": 1048576,
  "max_connections": 65536,
  "ping_interval": 120000000000,
  "ping_max": 2,
  "http_port": 8222,
  "ssl_timeout": 0.5,
  "max_control_line": 1024,
  "max_payload": 1048576,
  "start": "2015-07-14T13:29:26.426805508-07:00",
  "now": "2015-07-14T13:30:59.349179963-07:00",
  "uptime": "1m33s",
  "mem": 8445952,
  "cores": 4,
  "cpu": 0,
  "connections": 39,
  "routes": 0,
  "remotes": 0,
  "in_msgs": 100000,
  "out_msgs": 100000,
  "in_bytes": 1600000,
  "out_bytes": 1600000,
  "slow_consumers": 0
}

/connz

The endpoint http://localhost:8222/connz reports more detailed information on current connections. It uses a paging mechanism which defaults to 1024 connections.

You can control these via URL arguments (limit and offset). For example: http://localhost:8222/connz?limit=1&offset=1.

You can also report detailed subscription information on a per connection basis using subs=1. For example: http://localhost:8222/connz?limit=1&offset=1&subs=1.

{
  "now": "2015-07-14T13:30:59.349179963-07:00",
  "num_connections": 2,
  "offset": 0,
  "limit": 1024,
  "connections": [
    {
      "cid": 571,
      "ip": "127.0.0.1",
      "port": 61572,
      "pending_size": 0,
      "in_msgs": 0,
      "out_msgs": 0,
      "in_bytes": 0,
      "out_bytes": 0,
      "subscriptions": 1,
      "lang": "go",
      "version": "1.0.9",
      "subscriptions_list": [
        "hello.world"
      ]
    },
    {
      "cid": 574,
      "ip": "127.0.0.1",
      "port": 61577,
      "pending_size": 0,
      "in_msgs": 0,
      "out_msgs": 0,
      "in_bytes": 0,
      "out_bytes": 0,
      "subscriptions": 1,
      "lang": "ruby",
      "version": "0.5.0",
      "subscriptions_list": [
        "hello.world"
      ]
    }
  ]
}

/routez

The endpoint http://localhost:8222/routez reports information on active routes for a cluster. Routes are expected to be low, so there is no paging mechanism with this endpoint.

The routez endpoint does support the subs argument from the /connz endpoint. For example: http://localhost:8222/routez?subs=1

{
  "now": "2015-07-14T13:30:59.349179963-07:00",
  "num_routes": 1,
  "routes": [
    {
      "rid": 1,
      "remote_id": "de475c0041418afc799bccf0fdd61b47",
      "did_solicit": true,
      "ip": "127.0.0.1",
      "port": 61791,
      "pending_size": 0,
      "in_msgs": 0,
      "out_msgs": 0,
      "in_bytes": 0,
      "out_bytes": 0,
      "subscriptions": 0
    }
  ]
}

/subsz

The endpoint http://localhost:8222/subscriptionsz reports detailed information about the current subscriptions and the routing data structure.

{
  "num_subscriptions": 3,
  "num_cache": 0,
  "num_inserts": 572,
  "num_removes": 569,
  "num_matches": 200000,
  "cache_hit_rate": 0.99999,
  "max_fanout": 0,
  "avg_fanout": 0,
  "stats_time": "2015-07-14T12:55:25.564818051-07:00"
}

Creating monitoring applications

NATS monitoring endpoints support JSONP and CORS. You can easily create single page web applications for monitoring. To do this you simply pass the callback query parameter to any endpoint.

For example:

http://localhost:8222/connz?callback=cb

Here is a JQuery example implementation:

$.getJSON('http://localhost:8222/connz?callback=?', function(data) {
  console.log(data);
});